Studio Henning Haupt

Blind Paintings I, 2012

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This series of paintings engages in a production process that questions the memory and knowledge of our brain versus the memory and knowledge of our body.
Each of the paintings started out with one simple thought, an assignment for a drawing that builds a first layer of the painting. This assignment is documented as the title of the work. This initial drawing is executed with white crayon on white paper – a condition that made it impossible to see the result of the drawing developing in front of me on the paper. I relied on my bodily knowledge of drawing, a learned intuition, and my brain memorizing the invisible lines.
The drawing becomes visible in the next step of the process by adding black, semitransparent layers of oil paint. The now-visible result of drawing and painting is subject to additional decisions such as adding darker or lighter tones.
In these paintings a rational assignment is set in tension with the intangible, atmospheric qualities of the result. The work juxtaposes a expression of words, the title, its execution in an action, and a resulting product. The paintings offer a comprehensive construct, open to personal appreciation revealing the relativeness of the rational phrase of the title. They invite the audience to share the pleasure of drawing and painting; to dive into form, space, and atmosphere; and to decipher thoughts and processes.